Archive Monthly Archives: December 2018

School Shootings are not new.

The earliest known school shooting in the United States on school property was,  the Pontiac’s Rebellion school massacre on July 26, 1764,

4 Lenape American Indian entered the schoolhouse (near present-day Greencastle, Pennsylvania), shot and killed schoolmaster Enoch Brown, killed 9-10 children (varying reports) and only two children survived the massacre. 

Starting in the mid-1800’s school shooting started to become more prevalent. 1853, 67, 68, 73, 79, 84 and the list goes on. 

What has changed in the present day events is the amount of deaths per shooting. In the 1800-early 1900’s shootings, one to 3 people were shot and not all ended in death. 

Today, the U.S. statistics are staggering.

Annual numbers look like this:
1992-1993 (44 Homicides & 55 Deaths resulting from school shootings)
1993-1994 (42 Homicides & 51 Deaths resulting from school shootings)
1994-1995 (17 Homicides & 20 Deaths resulting from school shootings)
1995-1996 (29 Homicides & 35 Deaths resulting from school shootings)
1996-1997 (23 Homicides & 25 Deaths resulting from school shootings)
1997-1998 (35 Homicides & 40 Deaths resulting from school shootings)
1998-1999 (25 Homicides from school shootings in the U.S.)
1999-2000 (25 Homicides from school shootings in the U.S.) 

2000-2001 (19 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2001-2002 (4 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2002-2003 (14 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2003-2004 (29 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2004-2005 (20 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2005-2006 (5 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2006-2007 (38 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2007-2008 (3 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2008-2009 (10 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2009-2010 (5 Deaths resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)

-courtesy of https://www.k12academics.com/

2011 (5 Deaths, 13 injured resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2012 (41 Deaths 16 injured resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2013 (17 Deaths 34 injured resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2014 (15 Deaths 36 injured resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2015 (20 Deaths 41 injured resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2016 (10 Deaths 15 injured resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
2017 (17 Deaths 28 injured resulting from school shootings in the U.S.)
And currently in 2018 44 Deaths and 81 injured resulting from school shootings in the U.S. -courtesy of Wikipedia

Students who were evacuated after a shooting at North Park Elementary School walk past well-wishers to be reunited with their waiting parents at a high school in San Bernardino, California, U.S. April 10, 2017. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

What are similarities of the shooters?

When interviewed by authorities, shooters often told investigators that alienation or persecution drove them to violence. Instead of looking for traits, Secret Service urges all adults to ask about behavior:

1. What has this child said?
2. Do they have grievances?
3. What do their friends know?
4. Do they have access to weapons?
5. Are they depressed or despondent?

One “trait” that has not yet attracted as much attention is the gender difference: nearly all school shootings are perpetrated by young males. Is violence gender specific?

Only 2 female school shooting incidents have been documented. – courtesy of https://www.k12academics.com/school-shootings  

With each new shooting, we have to ask the important question, how can we do the most to protect our children, our educators, our future from murdered? 


Mother and son after Sal Castro school shooting

Returning to school, after a shooting.

 

School shootings are far too familiar for this generation and the young people. Regular lock downs and active shooter drills that are a part of  student/teacher life in the current world.

“Gun control should be taken a hell of a lot more seriously. It should have happened after Columbine, it should have happened after Sandy Hook. I’ve never done anything about it myself, but obviously I feel a lot more strongly now. It gives you a whole new motivation, to fight for ourselves and the people who were killed.” -Lara E.

Mass shootings are a constant threat.  Trauma is effecting our children’s brain patterns.

School shootings don’t just end lives,  they dramatically change the lives surrounding them. We often focus on the victims of mass shootings, mourn their deaths.  Remember, it’s the survivors who are left to pick up the pieces and try to move on from the violence they witnessed first hand.  Survivors develop a form of PTSD.

Almost a third will develop post-traumatic stress disorder.

As mass public shootings, and in particular,  school shootings, continue to happen, our young people and their families are increasingly dealing with their devastating psychological effects.

But how can we help these survivors?

Families and loved ones, NEED to be on the look out for PTSD symptoms and lending a nonjudgmental listening ear. While the average grief tends to lessen with time, PTSD symptoms normally increase as the survivor has time to reflect on the trauma.

“The shooter came for our classroom. He came after he shot those other two people in the hallway. The door was locked, thankfully, but he shot quite a few bullets into the glass and it hit a few people behind me,” student Samantha G. told the TODAY show.

Her best friend was shot and killed next to her.

To learn more about what you can do to help survivors of a traumatic life event, click here.

“I thought someone had dropped something in the kitchen at first. But then I heard more and I went under a high table. I heard more rounds, grabbed my friends and yelled “Get down. This is happening, this is happening right now.”” one survivor said.

It takes a long time for schools and it’s students.  to return to normal. IF they ever do.

Getty Images

“I heard screaming. I heard about 5, 6 gunshots. We thought they were firecrackers because they sounded like them. And we heard the police yelling and there was banging on the doors. And I saw some bodies. It wasn’t good. One of the bodies I recognized, it was my friend’s teacher,” an unnamed student told CNN.

Together, we should all work to educate ourselves about trauma and its aftermath. Let’s make a commitment to being nonjudgmental and open-minded to helping others through traumatic events. School is hard enough. We’ve all been there. And now our children are in a surprise war zone.

Thanks to Self.com, Today, The New York Times, CNN